BUILDING A BETTER WORLD
  Print a hard copy of the schedule:  PDF (8.5 X 14) 
        (Problems printing? click here.)

MONDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2006

Human Rights for All! Youth Activism and Amnesty International
Auditorium
Mon, 10:00 – 11:15

You can change the world.

Sound impossible? We don't think so. Right now, across Canada and around the world, young people are taking action through Amnesty International to create a world where human rights are protected and defended.

Amnesty International is the largest organization in the world working to protect and promote human rights. It is present in more than 70 countries and has 1.8 million members, half of whom are youth.

What are human rights and what can you do to protect them? Come find out what you can do to ensure that human rights really are for everyone, every where!

Shauna MacLean is the National Youth and Student Program Coordinator for Amnesty International Canada. She works both in Canada and across the globe to empower young activists to take action to protect human rights.



The Ron Charbonneau Memorial Lecture
Auditorium
Mon, 1:00 – 2:15

Lieutenant-General the Honourable Romeo Dallaire, Senator, humanitarian, author and retired general is widely known for having served as Force Commander of UNAMIR, the ill-fated United Nations peacekeeping force for Rwanda between 1993 and 1994, and for trying to stop a war of genocide that was being waged by Hutu extremists against Tutsis and Hutu moderates.

 

 

 

 

 




Environmental Solutions Panel    
Auditorium
Mon, 2:30 – 3:45
   
Tricia Bell teaches Humanities courses and before beginning to teach at Vanier in the winter 2004 term, worked as a freelance researcher and writer advocating social and environmental justice. Ricardo Duenez teaches at Vanier, and has worked on numerous environmental projects in Eastern and Southern Africa. Louis Belle-Isle is a recently retired Vanier teacher and member of the College's Sustainability Committee.



 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17    

Auberge Shalom … Pour Femmes
A centre for women in abusive relationships and their dependent children.
Boardroom, N-186
Tues, 10:00 – 11:15
Auberge Shalom…pour femmes has been in operation since January 1989 servicing women from a wide array of cultural and religious backgrounds. Our services are free, bilingual and offered in a safe and caring environment.

We provide shelter for approximately 100 women and their dependent children each year. As well, in response to a growing need for specialized counselling services for women who need help before, after, or in lieu of shelter, we have recently opened an external Counselling and Resource Centre to specifically address these needs.

Our ultimate mission is to break the cycle of violence with the partnership of the community.



The impact of climate change on Northern communities  
Auditorium
Tues, 11:30 - 12:45
 
The Arctic is the barometer of the planet's health and Inuit are the mercury in that barometer. As the 155,000 Inuit of Canada, Greenland, Alaska USA and Chukotka, Russia are poisoned by contaminants from afar and transformed by climate change, the fundamental human right to health and cultural survival is increasingly at risk. Studies have shown that Inuit are the net recipients of Persistent Organic Pollutants because the marine mammals that make up a large part of their diet are ridden with these toxic chemicals that find their way into the 'Arctic sink'. Climate change presents an even greater challenge for Inuit as it affects every aspect of their lives. For the last 15 years, Inuit hunters and Elders have been reporting changes to the environment due to changes with the climate. These observations accord with the 2004 Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) which was conducted by over 300 scientists from 15 countries under the auspices of the Arctic Council. The ACIA not only confirms that climate change is already happening in the Arctic but it concludes that it will accelerate over the next hundred years. Unless dramatic action is taken to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions, the ACIA projects nothing less then the demise of the age-old Inuit hunting and food sharing culture. Inuit do not want to be powerless victims and become a footnote to globalization. Therefore they feel they must exert international influence beyond their numbers to ensure that dramatic action is taken to cut global greenhouse gas emissions. Sheila Watt-Cloutier is a former Chair of Inuit Circumpolar Conference. She has presented to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights a Climate Change-based Human Rights Petition.



School as an alien planet    
Auditorium
Tues, 1:00 – 2:15
   
What turns kids off school? Is college any better? When do things go wrong for a student? What goes wrong? Why does it go wrong? Based on a three-year research project, this presentation profiles the gulf between what many students want and what schools and colleges offer. Come and find out what sounds familiar and what doesn't. How can colleges engage students more fully?

Jock Mackay teaches Sociology and Humanities. Doug Miller is a learning specialist at The Learning Centre. Guy Quinn teaches Physical Education, specializing in Outdoor Education.
All three have worked in Explorations since its inception. Collectively they have 90 years of experience at Vanier College, much of it devoted to students in difficulty.



Student activism -- Getting involved    
Amphitheatre
Tues, 2:30 – 3:45
   
Many of us go through life aware that there are many problems and injustices in the world, but remain blissfully apathetic about things that do not involve us personally. Others feel compelled to take action to correct the problems they learn about. Three student panelists will talk about projects they have been involved with and explain what motivated them to move from passive learning to concrete action.
Alessandra Salituri is a Vanier Liberal Arts graduate currently studying at McGill who visited a school project in Kenya this past summer as part of her on-going commitment to the Making Poverty History campaign. Remi Sealey is a student in Vanier's Music Department who practices the Chinese meditation form of Falun Gong. He is actively involved in educating the public about the abuse of human rights and the oppression faced by Falun Gong practitioners in The People's Republic of China. Marcella Vega spent 17 months as a refugee claimant in sanctuary in the basement of St. Andrew's - Norwood United Church just a few blocks from Vanier College. Since the acceptance of her claim for refugee status, she has worked to support other claimants unjustly treated by the Canadian Refugee Review Board and is currently a co-chairperson of the Vanier Social Justice Committee.

 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18    

The swastika: Origins, evolution and appropriation of a symbol  
Auditorium
Wed, 8:30 – 9:45
This highly visual presentation discusses the history and use of the swastika in past and present cultures around the world, as well as the symbol's appropriation by the Nazi regime. It will be shown that the swastika is interpreted in a wide range of ways, and that the negative views many have of the symbol are not shared by all cultures of the world. This presentation will end with several open-ended questions which can lead to an interesting debate and discussion.
  Matthieu Sossoyan has taught Anthropology and Methodology at Vanier College since 1999. His research interests include North American pop culture, the history of Canada's Native Peoples, and archaeology. He has also organized the 2005 and 2006 editions of the Trip for Tolerance. You may contact him directly at sossoyam@vaniercollege.qc.ca  



Comedy show -- On the Spot improv
Auditorium
Wed, 10:30 – 11:45
On the spot is composed of some of Montreal's finest comediens, actors, writers and journalists. Their show is fast-paced, topical, interactive and based on audience suggestions, quick wit and brilliant teamwork. See their website.



The 5th Annual Social Science Quiz Show
Auditorium
Wed, 12:00 – 1:15
Master of Ceremonies: Peter Gantous.
Trivia competition between four teams of Social Science and Liberal Arts whizzes. Come cheer them on!



Movie: An Inconvenient Truth (100 mins.)  
Auditorium
Wed, 1:30 – 3:10
   
Humanity is sitting on a ticking time bomb. If the vast majority of the world's scientists are right, we have just ten years to avert a major catastrophe that could send our entire planet into a tail-spin of epic destruction involving extreme weather, floods, droughts, epidemics and killer heat waves beyond anything we have ever experienced. If that sounds like a recipe for serious gloom and doom -- think again. From director Davis Guggenheim comes the Sundance Film Festival hit, An Inconvenient Truth, which offers a passionate and inspirational look at one man's fervent crusade to halt global warming's deadly progress in its tracks by exposing the myths and misconceptions that surround it. That man is former Vice President Al Gore, who, in the wake of defeat in the 2000 election, re-set the course of his life to focus on a last-ditch, all-out effort to help save the planet from irrevocable change. With wit, smarts and hope, An Inconvenient Truth ultimately brings home Gore's persuasive argument that we can no longer afford to view global warming as a political issue - rather, it is the biggest moral challenges facing our global civilization.



Auberge Shalom … Pour Femmes
A centre for women in abusive relationships and their dependent children.
A-308 (limited seating)
Wed, 1:30 – 3:00
Auberge Shalom…pour femmes has been in operation since January 1989 servicing women from a wide array of cultural and religious backgrounds. Our services are free, bilingual and offered in a safe and caring environment.

We provide shelter for approximately 100 women and their dependent children each year. As well, in response to a growing need for specialized counselling services for women who need help before, after, or in lieu of shelter, we have recently opened an external Counselling and Resource Centre to specifically address these needs.

Our ultimate mission is to break the cycle of violence with the partnership of the community. With Alison Henderson.



True Love versus Infatuation  
Auditorium
Wed, 3:30 – 4:45

Karen Tee, Vanier Psychology teacher, specialist in the psychology of love, relationships and sexuality, will discuss the difference between true love and infatuation, plus some other things we know about love.


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19

   

Movie: An Inconvenient Truth (100 mins.)  
Auditorium
Thurs, 8:10 – 9:50
   
Humanity is sitting on a ticking time bomb. If the vast majority of the world's scientists are right, we have just ten years to avert a major catastrophe that could send our entire planet into a tail-spin of epic destruction involving extreme weather, floods, droughts, epidemics and killer heat waves beyond anything we have ever experienced. If that sounds like a recipe for serious gloom and doom -- think again. From director Davis Guggenheim comes the Sundance Film Festival hit, An Inconvenient Truth, which offers a passionate and inspirational look at one man's fervent crusade to halt global warming's deadly progress in its tracks by exposing the myths and misconceptions that surround it. That man is former Vice President Al Gore, who, in the wake of defeat in the 2000 election, re-set the course of his life to focus on a last-ditch, all-out effort to help save the planet from irrevocable change. With wit, smarts and hope, An Inconvenient Truth ultimately brings home Gore's persuasive argument that we can no longer afford to view global warming as a political issue - rather, it is the biggest moral challenges facing our global civilization.



First Nations People: Community Renewal and Outreach    
Auditorium
Thurs, 10:00 – 11:15
   
With Chad Katsenhake:ron Diabo, Hepatitis C HIV/AIDS Outreach Worker and Tiotiake Drum Carrier (Native Friendship Centre of Montreal) and Ernest Webb, producer, writer, director and co-founder of Rezolution Pictures and Beesum Communications



Literature lecture  
Theatre Room B-323
Thurs, 10:30 – 12:00

Joy Kogawa is known for her novels, poetry, essays, and activism. She was born in Vancouver in 1935. As a second-generation Japanese Canadian or nisei, she has told the stories of Japanese-Canadians in her writing. Kogawa and her family were evacuated to Slocan, British Columbia and later to Coaldale, Alberta during the Second World War. She has also been involved in seeking redress from the Canadian government for the internment of twenty thousand Japanese Canadians during World War II. She was made a Member of the Order of Canada. From 1983 to 1985 Kogawa worked with the National Association of Japanese Canadians. Kogawa pursued studies in education at the University of Alberta and taught elementary school in Coaldale for a year.

She then studied music at the University of Toronto followed by studies at the Anglican Women's Training College and the University of Saskatchewan. Joy Kogawa has published several collections of poetry, essays, children's literature and the novels Obasan, Istuka, and The Rain Ascends. Obasan won several book awards; it focuses on Japanese Canadians and the injustices they experienced during and after the Second World War. The central character of this book is Naomi, who reappears in Kogawa's children's book, Naomi's Road and again in Itsuka. The latter text concentrates on the emotional and political involvement of Naomi in the Japanese-Canadian redress movement. Kogawa's novel, The Rain Ascends, deals with an emotional issue of a different kind: the sexual abuse of children by a Protestant clergyman. Her book length poem, A Song of Lilith published in 2001 is a collaborative work on the mythical figure of Lilith (Adam's "first" wife).




Things fall apart: Whatever happened to the USA?
Auditorium
Thurs, 11:30 – 12:45
Charles Levine taught Political Science and Humanities at Vanier until he retired last June. His research interest focused on American politics and international relations. In 1945, when the Second World War ended, the US was the most powerful country in the world, and arguable the most popular. This presentation will try to answer some of the questions concerning how the situation changed (deteriorated?). While the war in Iraq is part of the answer, things are more complicated than that.



THE FOLLOWING EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED
The challenges and solutions to climate change
Auditorium
Thurs, 1:00 – 2:15

This presentation will share pictures and stories of how climate change is already affecting people in different parts of the planet-sea level rise inundating small islands, floods in Bangladesh, and melting permafrost in the Arctic. How different countries are implementing solutions will be contrasted with indecision and inaction in Canada.

Dale Marshall is a climate change policy analyst at the David Suzuki Foundation. Dale has a Master's degree in Resource and Environmental Management from Simon Fraser University, a Bachelor's degree in Environmental Science and Biology from the University of Western Ontario and a Bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering from McGill University.



Movie: An Inconvenient Truth (100 mins.)  
Auditorium
Thurs, 2:30 – 4:10
   
Humanity is sitting on a ticking time bomb. If the vast majority of the world's scientists are right, we have just ten years to avert a major catastrophe that could send our entire planet into a tail-spin of epic destruction involving extreme weather, floods, droughts, epidemics and killer heat waves beyond anything we have ever experienced. If that sounds like a recipe for serious gloom and doom -- think again. From director Davis Guggenheim comes the Sundance Film Festival hit, An Inconvenient Truth, which offers a passionate and inspirational look at one man's fervent crusade to halt global warming's deadly progress in its tracks by exposing the myths and misconceptions that surround it. That man is former Vice President Al Gore, who, in the wake of defeat in the 2000 election, re-set the course of his life to focus on a last-ditch, all-out effort to help save the planet from irrevocable change. With wit, smarts and hope, An Inconvenient Truth ultimately brings home Gore's persuasive argument that we can no longer afford to view global warming as a political issue - rather, it is the biggest moral challenges facing our global civilization.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20

   

AIDS in Africa    
Auditorium
Fri, 10:00 - 11:15
   
Imagine a country where the life expectancy of a child born today is 45
years, a place where 20% of adults are HIV positive, but most have no access to effective medical treatment. Now imagine a group of countries where two million people die annually, in large part due to the lack drugs, which in Canada, are available to all who need them. Our brothers and sisters in sub-Saharan Africa live with these unimaginable realities. What can be done to help?
.
Nancy Wargny is the Dean of the Faculty of Social Science, Commerce, Arts, and Letters. She is a former Vanier Psychology teacher, who obtained her Ph.D. from McGill.



Who owns who? Or, How the third world got to be third    
Theatre Room, B-323
Fri, 11:30 - 12:45
   
Eric Lamoureux, History teacher at Vanier and social activist with a special interest in African history and Third World Studies, explores how the global economy keeps poor countries poor.

BACK TO VANIER HOME PAGE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Can't print the 8.5 X 14 PDF schedule onto regular 8.5 X 11 paper? In the Print Menu, make
sure the "Page Scaling" attribute is set to "Shrink large pages" or "Set to printer margins".

BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

revised October 12, 2006